Let’s talk about one of the most popular gemstone minerals in history; turquoise.  We’ll discuss the many colors and varieties while also taking a look a this stone’s healing properties, correspondences, and meanings.

Also, read on to be sure you’re not being duped by turquoise fakes! 

This stone is quite popular in jewelry (whereas selenite – with a Mohs hardness of 2, is not as popular because it gets scratched up much more easily), particularly in Native American jewelry and southwestern designs. Some of my fav jewelry pieces are turquoise!

Metaphysical Properties and History

Treasured for thousands of years, used in ancient Africa, Asia, South, and North America for many different purposes, this mineral is perhaps most often used as some form of protection.

Historically, turquoise was found to be worn by nobility in Ancient Egypt. There are so many museum pieces displaying the use of turquoise along with lapis lazuli, carnelian, and a few others. Plus, turquoise adorns the burial mask of Tutankhamun (aka King Tut) — one of the most well known and recognized artifacts of ancient times!

Considered sacred to the Navajo, this stone is known to be of the bringer of rain.

Since ancient times, it’s also been used as a traveler’s companion, given to those embarking on a long journey over the ages. It’s said that when many explorers and traders were crossing the seas by boat, turquoise was to help provide a safe voyage.

In fact, I always travel with turquoise as part of my travel mojo kit.

turquoise travel mojo kit

My travel mojo bag which includes a rough turquoise & hematite

This mineral invites in strength and vitality along with good communication skills (great for public speaking!) I personally like to pair it up with clear quartz for this purpose — amplifying its effect.

Chakras

We most often associate this stone with the Throat Chakra.

Remember, it’s all about communication, Babe.

It assists us to clearly articulate while being sure to speak our truth (and remembering to listen well too). Again, this includes all types of communication; public speaking as well as writing.

Geology

Turquoise is an opaque (not transparent) phosphate mineral with a Mohs hardness between 5-6, depending on the type of turquoise. You may not think of it as a technical crystal because its crystals are not actually visible and it doesn’t allow light to pass through. However, it IS indeed a crystal.

How?

It’s due to its crystalline structure (not visible to the naked eye), but it’s there at the micro-crystalline level.

Turq is now primarily found in the US Southwest as well as Iran, Tibet, China, Australia, and Afghanistan, typically dry arid climates.

Being a copper-derived mineral, its color can be a whole range of blues and greens… (think of an oxidized penny or the Statue of Liberty).

Since it also contains aluminum, I don’t recommend that you put it in a crystal bath or use it to make an ingestible gem elixir.

Why Green or Blue?

  • bluer turquoise comes from more coppe