Topic: UPDATED: Real Citrine vs. Fake Citrine | How to Tell the Difference

In today’s show we’re digging into exactly how to tell the difference between real citrine and the baked variety so:

  • you’re well-geo-educated on working with this powerful crystal
  • you’ll know confidentially what’s in your collection
  • you’ll have checklists on how to spot a fake
  • you can make well-informed purchases
  • …is it still Citrine-Energy?

Enter your information for my free pdf: Tips for Spotting Fake Citrine

In this blog post, I’ve included the show notes for today’s show or the most recent show, including the links and resources I reference in the video:

Resources

In my last show (Part 1 in my Citrine series), we discussed Citrine Healing Properties, Correspondences and Meanings so you can learn how to effectively work with this popular and powerful crystal. If you need some citrine background, go ahead and start there.

Enter your information for my free pdf (downloading this pdf subscribes you to my newsletter): Tips for Spotting Fake Citrine

By the way… have you ever looked at a crystal and thought, “Is this the real deal or is this just a fake?” Want my guidance on becoming more Crystal Savvy? Then come take a look at my Crystal Savvy: Crystal + Mineral Identification Class Elective. 

Natural Citrine

natural citrine

For instance, in the above photo, you can see some of what I was referring to in the show this week; you can see the variations of citrine color always with a yellow hue with the left one a very smokey yellow. All crystals shown here are Congo citrine with the exception of the Top Right, which happens to be a natural citrine from Brazil.

So, you can see these natural crystals have:

  • lots of clarity
  • the color is uniform throughout the crystal
  • they have a relatively straight quartz crystal formation
  • and no white base
  • with some red hematite tucked in where they were plucked out of the rock matrix

Baked Citrine

baked citrine

Below, we have amethyst that’s been baked to appear as what’s commonly sold as “citrine”. You can see how Crystal Family member, Shayla, baked her amethyst into citrine. Here she’s showing us her light colored amethyst before and after baking. Thank you, Shayla, for putting my teachings to the test and sharing your photos.

You can see that characteristic deeper orange color and tell-tale white base that looks like a root that’s been plucked out of a geode formation… that’s because that’s exactly how these usually grow, as part of a larger geode or druse. As a result of baking, the crystalline molecular bonds become weaker. (as I discussed this in detail in the show.)

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Have you ever looked at a crystal and thought, “Is this the real deal or is this just a fake?” Want my guidance on becoming more Crystal Savvy? Then come take a look at my Crystal Savvy: Crystal + Mineral Identification Class Elective. 

Hope you enjoyed this week’s topic. Please post your comments below!

Crystal Blessings,