New Crystal Fakes To Keep An Eye Out For

Hibiscus Moon fakes 4 Comments


Yep, we’ve got more crystal fakes to talk about today. Looks like this problem is becoming more and more prevalent.
Get Educated about Crystal Fakes
One of my greatest joys is investigating and researching possible fake minerals and then teaching our Crystal Family about what’s popping up out there, keeping us educated so we can avoid the confusion that comes along with misrepresentations and crystal fakes. This way we can all make informed decisions when adding specimens to our sacred collections.

The three I’m going to discuss today aren’t what I would classify as a misrepresentation; these are straight up Crystal FAKES.

If you feel passionate about this too, please share this post in any way you prefer. (***There are some handy “SHARE” buttons you can use at the bottom of this post***).

And if you haven’t already done so, you can [thrive_2step id='21832']download my free eBook on this subject[/thrive_2step], so you can grab my entire “Fakes” blog series in 1 convenient place and have a reference guide all your own. (Oh yes, this eBook has topped 100 pages now and includes all the info from this blog too). 🙂

[thrive_2step id='21832'][/thrive_2step]

Let’s dig into it!
Fake Moldavite
Moldavite has become quite the popular metaphysical stone. I’ve written before about its energy here.

Why would anyone want to create a synthetic version of this? Well, finding and mining for moldavite is getting harder.

Several years ago the Czech government changed the rules restricting miners abilities to dig no deeper than one meter deep (unless they’ve paid for a very expensive permit). In addition, it’s becoming increasingly harder to find the green rock since there’s a very limited supply of it and it’s becoming more and more scarce. It’s an expensive stone for this reason. So you can see the motivation for wanting to fake it.
Genuine Characteristics
Moldavite is most likely formed by an ancient meteorite’s violent impact with our planet. Because of the quick cooling that immediately followed, moldavite is characterized by lots of very small internal bubbles and random flow lines.

Another thing to look for in the real stuff can be found with a jeweler’s loupe. You’re looking for teeny-tiny worm-like wire filaments that won’t exist in the melted glass fakes.

[caption id="attachment_22180" align="aligncenter" width="746"] By Onohej zlatove [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons[/caption]
Fake Characteristics
Fake Moldavite, on the other hand, usually won’t exhibit much texture; they’ll be relatively perfect looking with no bubbles. Because much of the fake stuff is made of melted green glass (green bottle glass, melted down and then etched with acid to make it look like the real deal) they’ll have a wet-shiny look. In addition that bottle glass stuff will have a blue cast to it, whereas the real moldavite green has more of an olive tone.

It will be more uniform and smooth. If you’re looking at moldavite in bulk, you may also notice there are many pieces exhibiting the same shape and not randomly shaped at all.

Another trick, to kind of hide or disguise the fact that they look different from real moldavite…often times fakes will already be faceted or set into jewelry.

Also, large pieces of moldavite are extremely rare so, be aware.

As always, the price is a good indicator. If you find moldavite at a too-good-to-be-true price, start looking for signs of it being a fake.

Unfortunately, many of the moldavite fakes come from China, India, Japan or Thailand so if you’re buying online from those locales, be sure you’re buying from a reputable trusted seller.
Gold Lodestone
This was a new one I was alerted to recently. I had never heard of it but a couple of my students asked about it during our last term so it must be relatively new on the rock scene.

They really look like pyrite, don’t they?

I immediately suspected they had been painted. So I ordered some up and sure enough, they’re just regular lodestone (magnetic magnetite) that have been painted up with gold paint.

I’ve seen them being touted to bring luck and prosperity. You can get those energies from all natural lodestone, so I see no need for the gold paint on them.

I did a quick search and unfortunately, with the three sellers I found; no one disclosed that they were painted lodestone. Then again, maybe the shop owners aren’t even aware.
Yellow Tibetan Quartz | New Finds?
Now this one…

Captured your attention? Yep, mine too.

They’re pretty, there’s no doubt.

BUT, my experienced eye noticed that they looked a little too much like the synthetic green quartz I wrote about some time ago. I can tell from the characteristics that they used the same laboratory process as green quartz but have just started infusing a different chemical or dye to achieve these colors.
Yellow Tibetan Quartz/Spirit Quartz
The one in the above photo was listed as Yellow Tibetan Quartz/Spirit Quartz; most likely because it was purchased from Tibet, a popular spot where these sorts of synthetics often come from.
I could tell from the seller that they were not at all aware that this was a fake.
Let me tell you, I’m afraid to touch this spiny thing. Spirit quartz grows with tiny crystal facets on it. However, this thing has very fine crystal filament splinters growing on it that pierced me several times. It’s quite dangerous actually. That is NOT how natural crystal grows.

[thrive_2step id='21832'][/thrive_2step]
New Find Yellow Phantom Quartz Crystal
This next one was listed as “New Find Yellow Phantom Quartz Crystal Cluster Specimen”. I’m laughing… I can’t even get pissed anymore because this stuff has just gotten so ridiculous.

The listing also called this one “yellow citrine quartz”.

So which is it?

Citrine or Yellow Phantom?

I guess they thought the fancier woo-woo names they threw in, the better.

The listing also included this “helpful” info: “Please take note that each crystal will be slightly different from the picture due to it being a natural stone.” A natural stone you say? I don’t know… call me picky but I strongly feel that it needs to be disclosed when a mineral specimen is synthetic.
Blue Phantom Quartz
OK, I have to admit, this is one is pretty eye-catching. The Blue Phantom Quartz was obtained from the same seller as the above “Yellow Phantom”. The seller shipped from China. I suspect these were grown in the same lab.

This one was also listed as a “Natural Quartz” and ironically the listing said this: “Blue Phantom in Quartz Crystal is, of course, a Throat Chakra crystal. It helps us speak our truth.”

Really?

Ok, so you’re probably wondering how I can tell these are synthetics.

Here’s what to look for…
DEAD GIVEAWAY TELL-TALE SIGNS to look for:

  • Crystal tips and apexes that have an etched or stepped growth pattern; due to forced regrowth of a quartz cluster (or sometimes they’re entirely synthetic)
  • Crystal apexes (tips) that are trigonal (3 facets) rather than the more common hexagonal (6 facet tip)
  • More color concentration at apexes (even look like phantoms so may be higher in price!)
  • Many of these specimens on eBay hail from China or Tibet (as did these examples)
  • Can look like spirit or fairy quartz w/ the same sort of teeny crusted crystals points that tend to cover the crystal shafts; due to the forced regrowth, but the crystal growth is MUCH smaller than a genuine spirit quartz

Always use your common sense and the best protection from this is to be well-informed yourself.

**Please SHARE this info with other crystal lovers so that we all stay in-the-know and well-informed. No duping us with FAKES!!!**
[thrive_2step id='21832']
[/thrive_2step]

Can you tell I’m passionate about this stuff? If you are too and want to know more about the mineral kingdom so you can be confident in what you’re getting then you may want to check out my Crystal Savvy: Crystal and Mineral ID class here.
Do your thing
If you choose to work with man-made crystals and you enjoy them just fine or it’s been working for you… as I always say:
“keep on ‘truckin’”. Don’t change a thing!
I just want us all to have the geo-knowledge first. Then you can make an informed decision regarding how you choose to work with these “stones”.

And as always, the moral of the story here is…

Buyer Beware: Who are you buying from? Are they reputable? Do they know what they’re talking about? Are you doing your own due diligence & research? The best way to protect yourself is education.

We all love the beautiful jewels that mama earth creates and you don’t know what you don’t know… until you know better. So, I hope you’ve learned something new here today.

Have you seen any of these or new crystal fakes or misrepresentations recently? Please share in the comments below!

Crystal Blessings,

Hibiscus Moon

BTW… like this sort of stuff? Then grab my FREE handy downloadable Crystal Fakes Reference eBook!

This is the EXACT eBook you need in order to navigate the gem shows, crystal shops, and eBay, get the REAL thing and get what you pay for. Don’t get scammed or duped into buying FAKES… unless that’s exactly what you want!

[thrive_2step id='21832']Click here now to download your free copy![/thrive_2step]

New Crystals Fakes, Misrepresentations and Frauds to Watch Out For

Hibiscus Moon fakes 19 Comments

Well, I think we’re a bit overdue for another “fakes” blog post to add to my series.

There’s an entire series of blog posts I’ve written over the years as fakes have popped up more and more. If you want to read up on all the fakes that I’ve reported on, we’ve gathered them all up into my Free Crystal Fakes Reference Guide, which includes all the previous blog posts in the fakes series.  Good to have on hand when crystal shopping! 

[thrive_2step id='21832'][/thrive_2step]

Now, on my annual trips to the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show I get to view a lot of what’s hot on the market and also spot some of these fakes first-hand. I also like to attend some of the lectures they have at the Convention Center so I can stay up-to-the-minute and knowledgeable about what’s going on in the mineral world. Last year I audited a lecture on Fake Minerals. This year my favorite lecture was: Crystal Faces and Forms. 

Heaven, I tell you!

Seriously. Crystal-topic academic lectures while hanging out at the biggest most glittery gem show in the world??! If you didn’t already know, I’m a HUGE Geo-Geek and yes, this is my idea of a GOOD-FLIPPIN’-TIME!

One thing that’s evident from these gemmy trips is that unfortunately, the artificial mineral/ gemstone market is on the rise.
Several years ago I noticed that there seemed to be a bit of an info-gap in our crystal community on some good solid easy-to-understand data regarding this sort of thing.
Informing our community on this topic has become a passion of mine. Being a former science department head, having studied geology at the Masters level + being an author and the founder of a Crystal Healing Academy with a relatively large following gives me a good platform to shout about crystal fakes. Right? So, I feel it’s my duty and I’m honored to be given the opportunity and privilege to serve in this way.

My goal is to educate our crystal community on what’s currently on the market so we can make intelligent buying decisions when adding special new crystal specimens to our sacred collections. If you feel passionate about this too, please share this post in any way you prefer. (There are some handy-dandy “SHARE” buttons you can use at the bottom of this post).

Keep this in mind: Always use your common sense.  The best protection from crystal fakes is to be well-informed yourself.

Real vs. Fake Jade
Most jade is a beautiful soft green color (although it does come in other colors like purple, red, yellow and white). Metaphysically, it’s a gentle stone that’s perfect for abundance work and also for assisting mothers to be and for fertility-work. There are many different types of jade such as jadeite, Mountain jade, British Columbia jade and Nephrite.

Jade is also a wonderful stone full of healing energy and a favorite to use alongside beauty regimes as it’s great for the skin and hair.

However, due to its HUGE popularity in Asia… we now have jade-fakes to contend with.

So, what to do?

Here are two quick ways to check if it’s the real deal …

  • Look for the fibers. Fibers mean it’s real.
  • First thing to do is be sure you go shopping with a jeweler’s loupe (10x magnification is what I find to be the most useful for me) and look at the piece you’re considering purchasing under some natural sunlight or really good lighting.

    What you’re looking for are little asbestos-like hairy fibers.

    Sometimes chrysoprase is sold off as jade and it won’t have those little teeny fibers because of its microcrystalline structure making it look all the same with no fibers at all under the jeweler’s loupe.

  • Temperature
  • Jade will be cold or cool to the touch and won’t warm up right away in your hand.

    I’ll also be sharing some other easy to use methods to id a fake jade from the real thing in an upcoming live class! More on that below.
    Red Malachite
    I first heard of this one from one of my students early last year.

    I was like, “huh”?

    My confusions stemmed from my knowledge that malachite is a copper-derived stone and anything copper-derived will always be blue or green. Malachite is always a rich vibrant green color like these pieces here:

    [caption id="attachment_1960" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Smoothed & polished malachite[/caption]

    So, I knew something was up.

    Then a few more students asked me again about this red “malachite” more recently. 

    This one really caught my curiosity. What is this stuff?! I had to know. 

    I got a hold of some and tested it out for myself.

    So I discovered it ain’t no jasper, agate or malachite. It’s a carbonate; probably a red travertine (limestone with calcite). I can show you how to do easy at-home tests like this yourself… more on that below. 

    Turns out “red malachite” is simply a new marketing term that some sellers have chosen to adopt in order to sell off some red-banded carbonate stones with no transparency. See, without the catchy new name this stuff used to just sit around. No one thought it was worth polishing/tumbling. Usually, this sort of stone would be considered “low-grade” material. :/

    But, I actually think it’s quite pretty myself. It would probably sell just fine without the misleading name attached to it. What do you think?
    When this kind of misinformation happens it ends up causing a lot of confusion in our crystal community. Not to mention falsely drives up prices.
    So this “red malachite” has NOTHING to do with real malachite, not geologically and not energetically. Personally, I won’t be calling it “red malachite” (to try to eliminate confusion) but will call it as it is; red carbonate. It seems to have all the same energetic properties as, say, a red jasper; an ideal grounding and stabilizing root chakra stone that invites us to become physically stronger or more fearless. Good stuff!
    Fake Opal
    I’m not talking about opalite here as we’ve discussed that before.

    Now we have yet another sort of fake-opal to concern ourselves with; a new synthetic sort that’s made to fool even the experts.

    It looks very much like black precious opal.

    Black precious opal is known for:

    • its motivating quality
    • ability to release psychic wounds
    • ability to pull someone out of depression

    The photo below is the real deal:

    The color flashes and iridescence or “fire” in the fake stuff is what they call “non-directional”, meaning that it can be cut any which way while still maintaining the same exact flash of color. That’s just not the case with real opal.

    This is what the synthetic opal looks like:

    Unfortunately, I don’t have any handy tips for you to use to help ID this bad-boy. Black opal is expensive anyways so it’s always best to have an appraiser check out your opal for authenticity.

    Frustrated?
    Yeah. This fake stuff is starting to wear on me a bit too, but the good news is; the more informed we are as a community the less it’s going to affect us.

    Please remember, I always say, if you choose to work with man-made crystals and you enjoy them that’s just fine and a name is just a name. You can call a stone anything you like.  If it’s been working for you…“keep on ‘truckin’”. Don’t change a thing!

    I just want all of us to have the geo-knowledge first. Then you can make an INFORMED decision regarding how you choose to use these stones in your practice.

    And as always, the moral of the story here is… 
    Buyer Beware: Who are you buying from? Are they reputable? Do they know what they’re talking about? Are you doing your own due diligence and research? The best way to protect yourself is education.
    If you didn’t already know this stuff, now you’re armed with a bit more information. 🙂 We all love the beautiful crystals and minerals that Mama Earth creates and the truth is, you don’t know what you don’t know… until you know it.

    **Please SHARE this info with other Crystal Lovers so that we all stay in-the-know and well-informed. No duping us with FAKES!**

    Have you seen any of these specimens I’ve mentioned here or any new fakes or misrepresentations recently?  I’d love to hear in the comments below!

    Now, again, if this topic rings your bell and you’d like to become confident in identifying fakes and misrepresentations in the marketplace then you might be interested in my upcoming Live Class- Crystal Savvy; Crystals + Mineral Identification. Registration is open now for my LIVE 3 class elective for a very short time and closes this Friday at midnight ET.  Click here for all the details and to register.  

    Crystal Blessings,

     

     

     

    BTW…like this sort of stuff? Then grab your FREE handy downloadable Crystal Fakes Reference eBook!

    This is the EXACT eBook you need in order to navigate the gem shows, crystal shops & eBay, get the REAL thing & get what you pay for. Don’t get scammed or duped into buying FAKES…unless that’s exactly what you want!

    [thrive_2step id='21832']Click here now to download your free copy![/thrive_2step]

     

    More Crystal Fakes: Healerite, Larimar & Galena Geodes???

    Hibiscus Moon Crystals, fakes 41 Comments

    I have more “FAKE CRYSTALS” updates for us today! I think this has become one of my fav blog posts to write. ♥

    I really want to educate our #CrystalHottie community on what’s available out there so we can make informed decisions when adding specimens to our sacred collections. If you feel passionate about this too, please share this post in any way you prefer. (There are some handy-dandy “SHARE” buttons you can use at the bottom).

    And if you haven’t already done so, you can [thrive_2step id='21832']download my free eBook on this subject[/thrive_2step] so you can grab all my “Fakes” blog posts in 1 convenient place & have a reference guide all your own.
    Galena Geodes aka Berber Geodes
    OK, these are becoming more popular on the metaphysical market right now.

    I mean…they’re gorgeous, right?

    [caption id="attachment_17316" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Photo credit: By Guy Courtois (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons[/caption]They’re often touted as being from Morocco.

    Well sorry Jelly Bean,  no such thing!

    What’s being done here is a natural quartz geode (or even a fake clay one may be used!!) is broken open & crushed lead-based Galena is sprayed inside.

    Whaaaaa? Don’t be fooled!

    How to Spot a Fake Larimar

    Yes, sadly larimar  is so freakin’ HOT on the market that it’s now being faked. 🙁

    It’s a semi-precious stone that is extremely rare due to supply & demand and mining it is extremely difficult. Although geological surveys either haven’t been done or were not able to determine the exact size of the mine so no one is really sure just how much larimar is left for us, since it’s only found in this 1 place. So what I’m saying here is that there just isn’t that much of it to be had & there’s a fear that it could be exhausted at any time. 

    Some have taken to whipping up plastic or reconstituted fake larimar in the lab.  (Ickk…I know). 

    Luckily, these lab-fakes are pretty easy to spot as they look NOTHING like the real deal. If you familiarize yourself with the genuine stones by looking at lots of photos of it you’ll be able to easily pick out the lab created fakes.

    [caption id="attachment_18436" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Genuine Larimar[/caption]

    Larimar is a type of pectolite; a sodium calcium silicate that forms in cavities of basaltic lava.  It’s found in only 1 place on the entire planet: the Barahona region mines in the Dominican Republic.

    The mines are really difficult to access  AND the area may be closed off 5 months of the year due to the torrential rains & hurricane season making it very unsafe to dig.

    [caption id="attachment_9125" align="aligncenter" width="570"] This is the REAL DEAL![/caption]

    So you can probably now easily see the motive to fake this stone. Right?

    Some sellers desperately get a hold of some lower quality larimar intermingled with some silicate/quartz containing rock material and sell that off as larimar. Well, technically, they’re not entirely wrong here & energetically this is still a gorgeous energy to work with! LET’S BE CLEAR ON THAT.

    My purpose here is to inform you & make sure that you’re armed with all the knowledge to make a highly informed purchase decision & that you’re not paying unnecessarily higher prices for something that is not entirely what it’s being claimed to be.

    True-Blue Larimar (*Yep! Pun intended*) should not be mixed in with any of that translucent quartz material at all…as seen in my photo below. This, Chick Pea, is not larimar but was being sold as such in a shop I was in.

    See the translucency?

    I tested it & it’s Mohs Hardness was a 7 telling me that is a copper-bearing quartz rock (chyrsocolla most likely?)

    {GEO GEEK FACTOID: Larimar’s Mohs Hardness is between 4.5-5}
    3 Easy Tips to Spot Fake Larimar

    • Is the stone translucent at all? Lift the stone up to the sun. This is an extremely reliable way to tell. If  you can see ANY light through any part of it, no bueno! Real-deal high quality larimar is opaque. Light does not penetrate at all.
    • Does it have any white veins, streaks or what look like clouds? This is a hallmark trait of genuine larimar and part of what makes it so beautiful.  White streaks are also very common in larimar stones and are key-markers that distinguish the stone from turquoise or other copper-bearing silicates. Be wary of any supposed larimar stone that doesn’t have some hint of a white streak, veins or clouds.
    • Ask about the mining location. Some unethical sellers try to come up with new & exotic locations for stones to make a great new story to help sell them. Yep, they just make something up. If it doesn’t come from the Dominican Republic, it ain’t the real deal. Walk away, Jelly Bean.

    BTW, I have a whole blog post devoted entirely to luscious larmiar here if you’d like to learn more about it. 🙂
    Healerite
    This is another one of those trademarked jobbies.

    I feel there’s no good reason to trademark this stone, b/c it’s part of a well-known subgroup of mineral that already has a perfectly good name: that would be “lime green serpentine”.

    My take on the whole trademarking of stones is here.

    [caption id="attachment_18437" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Healerite. Photo generously provided by Crystalline Cohort, Carla Gitto.[/caption]

    See, I really don’t like when sellers do this…someone takes a subgroup of an already known mineral, slaps a new name on it & trademarks it. 😛

    “Healerite” is simply a yellow-green serpentine subgroup being relabeled & sold for $50/piece (depending on size) instead of around $6.00/lb as it should be at any gem show you go to. 

    But, apparently, subgroups are being trademarked all over the freakin’ place.  Something to watch out for!

    Use your common sense here.
    If it’s too good to be true, then yeah, it probably is.

    **Please SHARE this info with other Crystal Hotties so that we all stay in-the-know & well-informed. No duping us with FAKES!!!!**
    If you choose to work with man-made crystals & you enjoy them just fine or it’s been working for you, I always say “keep on ‘truckin’”. Don’t change a thing!

    I just want us all to have the knowledge first & then you can make an informed decision regarding how you choose to use these “stones”.

    And as always, the moral of the story here is…Buyer Beware. Who are you buying from? Are they reputable? Do they know what they’re talking about? Are you doing your own due diligence & research? The best way to protect yourself is education.

    Do you have any fake-out stories to tell? Please post in the comments below & help us all out!

    Crystal Blessings,

     

     

    [thrive_2step id='21832'][/thrive_2step]

    P.S.…like this sort of stuff? Then grab your FREE handy downloadable Crystal Fakes 40 page Reference eBook!

    This is the EXACT eBook you need in order to navigate the gem shows, crystal shops & eBay, get the REAL thing & get what you pay for. Don’t get scammed or duped into buying FAKES!

    [thrive_2step id='21832']Click here now to download your free copy![/thrive_2step]

    More Fake Crystals to Watch Out For! (I’ve got some new ones for ya…)

    Hibiscus Moon Crystals, fakes 68 Comments

    Hey, Hey, Hey!!

    I have more “FAKE CRYSTALS” updates for us today.

    The artificial mineral market is continuing to grow & it seems there’s a “gap” in good reliable info on this sort of thing in general.

    I get really super-duper passionate about getting this info out there & I feel I’m in a very unique position to do just that, being a former science department chair, having studied geology at the Masters level & being a Crystal Healing Teacher with a pretty large platform  gives me a great advantage…so how could I NOT heed the call?

    I’m so honored to be able to serve in this way & grateful for being given the opportunity to do so!

    I really want to educate our #CrystalHottie community on what’s available out there so we can make really informed decisions when adding specimens to our sacred collections. If you feel passionate about this too, please share this post in any way you prefer. (There are some handy-dandy “SHARE” buttons you can use at the bottom). 😉

    And if you haven’t already done so, you can [thrive_2step id='21832']download my free eBook on this subject[/thrive_2step] so you can grab all my “Fakes” blog posts in 1 convenient place & have a reference guide all your own.
    Vibrant Pink Tourmaline
    Mostly, I’ve seen these at the most recent Tucson Gem Shows or popping up on eBay from the Middle East.

    The color really pops so it really catches your eye! Not to say that pink tourmaline of this color doesn’t exist in nature. It so totally does!

    BUT I can tell these in the below photo are FAKES.

    HOW can I tell?
    Well, let me tell you…b/c I want you to be informed & be able to catch this shiz too.

    No more duping us!

    Now it is HARD to pick out the fake pink tourmalines, but this one made it all too easy. It was coupled with an easily identified irradiated smokey quartz. Dead give away!

    See the dark 6 sided points up there? Yep, that’s quartz &, as you can see, it looks like black quartz, Morion quartz even…BUT ITS NOT!

    The above quartz is clearly artificially irradiated quartz.

    And since the pink color of the tourmaline & the black of the quartz is so strong, I’m going to assume that this specimen (and others like it) would be considered “HOT”; meaning that it could still be giving off significant amounts of radiation!!

    Another tell-tale sign would be that the color fades over time & very quickly when exposed to sunlight. Of course, you’d have to own the piece for a bit of time to catch that though.
    Opalite
    This stuffs is often mistaken for moonstone b/c of its luminous blue-ish glow.

    But it ain’t nothin’ more than manmade glass (or sometimes even plastic!) 🙁

    It’s usually flawless with no inclusions & blue-ish clear or milky colored. You may sometimes see little air bubbles from the synthetic manufacturing process or even scratches on the surface.

    Just know…it has NOTHING to do with real authentic opal.
    Fake Ajoite & Papagoite!!!
    I’ve lumped these 2 together b/c they are very closely related. Now, originally ajoite was named after a blue mass of color found in rocks in Ajo, Arizona but in speaking to geologists, they’ve since gotten strict about what they’ll apply that name to. This also helps to avoid confusion. Here’s an official geology page on mindat.org to help explain what you should be looking for.

    This one really has me fired up & ticked off today b/c I was recently selling my last 2 pieces of ajoite from my private collection. So in the process of that, it gave me the opportunity to have my nose shoved into this new fake situation that’s reared its UGLY head: FAKE AJOITE & PAPAGOITE! No duping us with FAKES!!!!

    Yep, this one really pisses me off! Probably b/c I have such a love affair with ajoite most especially. I’ve now realized I’m really protective of it.

    Both ajoite & papagoite are extremely rare & expensive…when they are genuine.

    I first became alerted to this issue recently when someone told me on 1 of my FB livestreams that they had just purchased a papagoite necklace of beads for a reasonable price.

    *Ding, ding, ding!!* Red flag up!

    Papagoite & ajoite do not come in beads…if they do then they are not the real deal.

    They should be in the form of a natural quartz point.

    If they are in a quartz mass or tumbled quartz stone of any sort then it’s most likely some form of chrysocolla. Some of these fakes are simply low-grade chrysocolla masses or tumbled stones.

    If it’s a fake quartz point being touted as “ajoite” with an off-color it’s most likely fake chlorite lab-grown quartz or dye injections we’ve been seeing as of late! Yuck.
    Remember that ajoite is a very specific very vibrant shade of blue turquoise (the EXACT shade is seen in the below photo), and the AUTHENTIC naturally included quartz points are all from the Messina Mine in Musina, South Africa:

    Also, keep in mind, these blue inclusions are always found in natural quartz crystal points, not beads, masses or cut & polished points.

    [caption id="attachment_18029" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Ajoite. Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons[/caption]

    Here’s a grouping of some of my ajoite collection in the above photo. The 4 points on the top are indeed the real thing. The 2 stones on the bottom are chrysocolla rocks.

    If it has more of a green hue…sorry, but it’s not the real deal. Match yours up with the photos above. Not quite right? A bit off? Then it’s NOT ajoite.

    ANOTHER VERY IMPORTANT TIP!: The blue inclusions are usually somewhere between the apex & midway up the shaft…not near the base of the crystal point. I’ve seen many of the fakes with the fake color gathered somewhere between the mid-shaft & the base. In authentic ajoite & papagoite, somehow the blue inclusions like to rise to the top of the apexes (apices) & even very often form phantoms!

    Someone was trying to pass this (below) off as ajoite. Puh-leeeeez! You can see the difference now, right?

    Same with papagoite; also a very specific vibrant color sky blue (bordering on Royal Blue) embedded in a natural quartz point.

    [caption id="attachment_18030" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Papagoite. Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0 [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons[/caption]Price is another indicator to authenticity here too. Not to say that if it’s super expensive that it means it’s the real deal!
    Ajoite Tips to REMEMBER:

    • Look for the green hue. Greenish? Not the real thing.
    • Does it look like most REAL ajoite & papagoite specimens you’ve studied before?
    • Is it a naturally included quartz point?
    • Where is the color saturation gathered in the specimen?
    • Is your seller trusted & knowledgeable about the mineralogy (not just the metaphysics)?
    • Then use price point as your next indicator

    Why so rare?
    Although ajoite & papagoite microcrystals were originally discovered in Ajo, Arizona the highly coveted quartz-included points only come from the Messina Copper Mine in South Africa, which stopped production & closed in 1992. 🙁

    The expensive price of ajoite & papagoite reflects the extremely high demand & low supply.

    Basic economics.

    Sellers of authentic ajoite & papagoite know what they have & fully understand their worth.

    Some of these sellers may know full well they are passing off fakes & others may have no idea. So I feel it’s up to us, Crystal Hotties, to inform such sellers so they can know in the future & pay it forward by educating their customers. ♥

    Use your common sense here. If it’s too good to be true, then yeah, it probably is.

    **Please SHARE this info with other Crystal Hotties so that we all stay in-the-know & well-informed. No duping us with FAKES!!!!**

    Yes, I’m VERY passionate about this.

    If you choose to work with man-made crystals & you enjoy them just fine or it’s been working for you, I always say “keep on ‘truckin'”. Don’t change a thing!

    I just want us all to have the knowledge first & then you can make an informed decision regarding how you choose to use these “stones”. And as always, the moral of the story here is…Buyer Beware. Who are you buying from? Are they reputable? Do they know what they’re talking about? Are you doing your own homework? The best way to protect yourself is through education.

    Do you have any fake-out stories to tell? Please post in the comments below & help us all out!

    Crystal Blessings,

     

     

    [thrive_2step id='21832'][/thrive_2step]
    P.S.…like this sort of stuff? Then grab your FREE handy downloadable Crystal Fakes 40-page Reference eBook!

    This is the EXACT eBook you need in order to navigate the gem shows, crystal shops & eBay, get the REAL thing & get what you pay for. Don’t get scammed or duped into buying FAKES!

    [thrive_2step id='21832']Click here now to download your free copy![/thrive_2step]